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hope

expressing human effects via mechanic mediums

10th April 2014

Link

CBCNews.ca Mobile →

Ugghhh

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25th March 2014

Link

UnPaper Towel Tutorial →

This is such a great idea for replacing paper towels!

I mean sure, you can use dish towels, but this way you won’t mix towels used for messy cleanups with drying your clean dishes towels! (if you’re a towel segregator like me)

Tagged: plasticfree2014disposablediy

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22nd March 2014

Link

Just found out how to recycle lightbulbs. EASY →

Looks like all/most London Drugs stores take your busted light bulbs back!

#plasticfree2014

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27th February 2014

Audio post - Played 0 times

Howard Brunt kills it on CFAX 1070 today talking about #UVic’s #IdeaFest happening March 3-8 2014!

Tagged: uvicideafest

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20th November 2013

Link

Numerous contaminants, including flame retardants, found in Arctic gulls →

Ew.

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25th July 2013

Photo

The mountains. I missed them

The mountains. I missed them

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25th July 2013

Post

The Road

Don’t take the next smattering of posts too seriously.
I embarked on a road trip today with my sweetie.

Juxtaposition: driving through Chiliwack’s fields of (possibly GMO) corn, listening to K’Naan and passing a posse of motorcyclists.

So far one dead raccoon, one thrift store, an empty chicken transport truck and an empty hog transport truck.
#thisiswhyidonteatmeat
more soon.

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7th June 2013

Post

bus

people on the bus: black jeans black hat black doc martens with cranberry tshirt music lover, guy who bought a new pillow for the weekend!! equalheight couple on the verge of being hipsters but are new to each other still nervous and chatty, mom going home, bus driver and me.

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17th March 2013

Post

Declare Your Superpowers

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17th March 2013

Video

Throwback

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14th March 2013

Photo reblogged from Dataviz by Sunlight with 16 notes

sunfoundation:

Metrominuto: The Subway-Inspired Map For Pedestrians

Walkability is a subject many cities are increasingly getting involved with. Our legs are often overlooked when thinking about transport in the city, with municipalities passionately constructing bicycle lanes and roads as far as the eye can see whilst competely forgetting about the pedestrian’s needs. Instead of focusing on these forms of transport, Pontevedra in northwest Spain has been trying for the last 15 years to make their city more walker-friendly. To further improve walkability, they have created a subway-inspired map for pedestrians.


what!

sunfoundation:

Metrominuto: The Subway-Inspired Map For Pedestrians

Walkability is a subject many cities are increasingly getting involved with. Our legs are often overlooked when thinking about transport in the city, with municipalities passionately constructing bicycle lanes and roads as far as the eye can see whilst competely forgetting about the pedestrian’s needs. Instead of focusing on these forms of transport, Pontevedra in northwest Spain has been trying for the last 15 years to make their city more walker-friendly. To further improve walkability, they have created a subway-inspired map for pedestrians.

what!

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14th March 2013

Photo reblogged from TEDx with 62 notes

tedx:

Mars Rover Curiosity takes a tour of Mars (Photo: NASA)
TEDx playlist: 4 TEDx Talks to celebrate Curiosity’s new discovery
Yesterday, NASA announced an amazing finding from its Mars Curiosity rover  — evidence of conditions once suitable for life on the Red Planet.
Says NASA:

Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon — some of the key chemical ingredients for life — in the powder Curiosity drilled out of a sedimentary rock near an ancient stream bed in Gale Crater on the Red Planet last month.
“A fundamental question for this mission is whether Mars could have supported a habitable environment,” said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “From what we know now, the answer is yes.” 

As we all wait with baited breath for more groundbreaking (pun intended) discoveries from the world’s most powerful rover to land on Mars, celebrate this incredible discovery with 4 TEDx Talks about the Red Planet:

How we landed a car on Mars: Jordan Evans at TEDxMidAtlanticIn this talk from TEDxMidAtlantic, Jordan Evans, Engineering Development and Operations Manager for the Mars Rover Curiosity project explains what it was like to be behind the scenes as the rover landed on Mars, making sure one of the greatest achievements in the history of space exploration was a success.

Why is there water on Earth? Why not Mars?: Maria Sundin at TEDxUniversityofGothenburgIn this talk, astrophysicist Maria Sundin discusses the importance of water to supporting life on our planet — and possibly others — and provides us with a look into the surprisingly watery history of our neighbor planet, Mars, a history which could have maybe included life.

No life on Mars? No problem; we’ll bring it: Bas Lansdorp at TEDxDelftBas Lansdorp is the head of the Mars One project, an endeavor to establish a human settlement on the planet Mars in 2023. At TEDxDelft, he lays out the project’s plan for a manned mission to Mars, explaining the drive behind this very ambitious goal.

Live like a rocket scientist: Charles Elachi at TEDxBeirutCharles Elachi is the director of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the outlet responsible for the Mars Science Laboratory, which launched and maintains Mars rover Curiosity. Just 100 days after Curiosity’s landing, he spoke at TEDxBeirut about how a sense of curiosity and a willingness to collaborate drive not only missions to Mars, but also all great things in life.
And a bonus — with absolutely no relation to TEDx — David Bowie’s seminal hit, “Life on Mars”:

tedx:

Mars Rover Curiosity takes a tour of Mars (Photo: NASA)

TEDx playlist: 4 TEDx Talks to celebrate Curiosity’s new discovery

Yesterday, NASA announced an amazing finding from its Mars Curiosity rover — evidence of conditions once suitable for life on the Red Planet.

Says NASA:

Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon — some of the key chemical ingredients for life — in the powder Curiosity drilled out of a sedimentary rock near an ancient stream bed in Gale Crater on the Red Planet last month.

“A fundamental question for this mission is whether Mars could have supported a habitable environment,” said Michael Meyer, lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Program at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. “From what we know now, the answer is yes.”

As we all wait with baited breath for more groundbreaking (pun intended) discoveries from the world’s most powerful rover to land on Mars, celebrate this incredible discovery with 4 TEDx Talks about the Red Planet:

How we landed a car on Mars: Jordan Evans at TEDxMidAtlantic
In this talk from TEDxMidAtlantic, Jordan Evans, Engineering Development and Operations Manager for the Mars Rover Curiosity project explains what it was like to be behind the scenes as the rover landed on Mars, making sure one of the greatest achievements in the history of space exploration was a success.

Why is there water on Earth? Why not Mars?: Maria Sundin at TEDxUniversityofGothenburg
In this talk, astrophysicist Maria Sundin discusses the importance of water to supporting life on our planet — and possibly others — and provides us with a look into the surprisingly watery history of our neighbor planet, Mars, a history which could have maybe included life.

No life on Mars? No problem; we’ll bring it: Bas Lansdorp at TEDxDelft
Bas Lansdorp is the head of the Mars One project, an endeavor to establish a human settlement on the planet Mars in 2023. At TEDxDelft, he lays out the project’s plan for a manned mission to Mars, explaining the drive behind this very ambitious goal.

Live like a rocket scientist: Charles Elachi at TEDxBeirut
Charles Elachi is the director of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the outlet responsible for the Mars Science Laboratory, which launched and maintains Mars rover Curiosity. Just 100 days after Curiosity’s landing, he spoke at TEDxBeirut about how a sense of curiosity and a willingness to collaborate drive not only missions to Mars, but also all great things in life.

And a bonus — with absolutely no relation to TEDx — David Bowie’s seminal hit, “Life on Mars”:

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14th March 2013

Photo reblogged from The FJP with 116 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Explainer: How We Wipe our Butts
Never underestimate my puerile instincts — or a love of a good explainer — this time triggered by Scientific American:

“Toilet Hygiene in the Classical Era,” by French anthropologist and forensic medicine researcher Philippe Charlier and his colleagues… examines tidying techniques used way back — and the resultant medical issues…
…The toilet hygiene piece reminds us that practices considered routine in one place or time may be unknown elsewhere or elsetime. The first known reference to toilet paper in the West does not appear until the 16th century, when satirist François Rabelais mentions that it doesn’t work particularly well at its assigned task. Of course, the ready availability of paper of any kind is a relatively recent development. And so, the study’s authors say, “anal cleaning can be carried out in various ways according to local customs and climate, including with water (using a bidet, for example), leaves, grass, stones, corn cobs, animal furs, sticks, snow, seashells, and, lastly, hands.” Sure, aesthetic sensibility insists on hands being the choice of last resort, but reason marks seashells as the choice to pull up the rear. “Squeezably soft” is the last thing to come to mind about, say, razor clams.
Charlier et al. cite no less an authority than philosopher Seneca to inform us that “during the Greco-Roman period, a sponge fixed to a stick (tersorium) was used to clean the buttocks after defecation; the sponge was then replaced in a bucket filled with salt water or vinegar water.” Talk about your low-flow toilets. The authors go on to note the use of rounded “fragments of ceramic known as ‘pessoi’ (meaning pebbles), a term also used to denote an ancient board game.”…
…Putting shards of a hard substance, however polished, in one’s delicate places has some obvious medical risks. “The abrasive characteristics of ceramic,” the authors write, “suggest that long term use of pessoi could have resulted in local irritation, skin or mucosal damage, or complications of external haemorrhoids.”

Explainers, scientific knowledge and general anthropology: always a good thing. — Michael
Scientific American, Toilet Issue: Anthropologists Uncover All the Ways We’ve Wiped reviews the British Medical Journal, Toilet hygiene in the classical era (you’ll need a university subscription to get in).
Image: Roman Butt Wiping Tools, via Flush.

awesome ew

futurejournalismproject:

Explainer: How We Wipe our Butts

Never underestimate my puerile instincts — or a love of a good explainer — this time triggered by Scientific American:

“Toilet Hygiene in the Classical Era,” by French anthropologist and forensic medicine researcher Philippe Charlier and his colleagues… examines tidying techniques used way back — and the resultant medical issues…

…The toilet hygiene piece reminds us that practices considered routine in one place or time may be unknown elsewhere or elsetime. The first known reference to toilet paper in the West does not appear until the 16th century, when satirist François Rabelais mentions that it doesn’t work particularly well at its assigned task. Of course, the ready availability of paper of any kind is a relatively recent development. And so, the study’s authors say, “anal cleaning can be carried out in various ways according to local customs and climate, including with water (using a bidet, for example), leaves, grass, stones, corn cobs, animal furs, sticks, snow, seashells, and, lastly, hands.” Sure, aesthetic sensibility insists on hands being the choice of last resort, but reason marks seashells as the choice to pull up the rear. “Squeezably soft” is the last thing to come to mind about, say, razor clams.

Charlier et al. cite no less an authority than philosopher Seneca to inform us that “during the Greco-Roman period, a sponge fixed to a stick (tersorium) was used to clean the buttocks after defecation; the sponge was then replaced in a bucket filled with salt water or vinegar water.” Talk about your low-flow toilets. The authors go on to note the use of rounded “fragments of ceramic known as ‘pessoi’ (meaning pebbles), a term also used to denote an ancient board game.”…

…Putting shards of a hard substance, however polished, in one’s delicate places has some obvious medical risks. “The abrasive characteristics of ceramic,” the authors write, “suggest that long term use of pessoi could have resulted in local irritation, skin or mucosal damage, or complications of external haemorrhoids.”

Explainers, scientific knowledge and general anthropology: always a good thing. — Michael

Scientific American, Toilet Issue: Anthropologists Uncover All the Ways We’ve Wiped reviews the British Medical Journal, Toilet hygiene in the classical era (you’ll need a university subscription to get in).

Image: Roman Butt Wiping Tools, via Flush.

awesome ew

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20th February 2013

Photo with 1 note

this one is a shout out to my mom for getting me this coat for christmas, and for the dope genes.

this one is a shout out to my mom for getting me this coat for christmas, and for the dope genes.

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27th January 2013

Link

People Moving - Data visualization →

thebest

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